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Artful August: Annalisa Ferraris
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11.8.2022

Artful minimalism meets architecture with Annalisa Ferraris.

Artful minimalism meets architecture with Annalisa Ferraris.

With an eye for interesting palettes created in forms and structures, Annalisa Ferraris has a fascination with marrying brutalist architecture and contemporary minimalism. Step into her light-filled studio of textured walls and freshly painted artworks.

Where did your artistic journey start and where did your passion for art come from?

It started from a very young age, I always took a liking to painting, drawing, anything creative really. After completing high school, I went on to study a BFA Honours at the National Art School which allowed me to develop my skills and meet like-minded people.

 

Did you always imagine yourself to be an artist?

Not really, I knew I’d end up in something creative - but thought it would be design or something in fashion - it wasn’t until I’d had a big solo show in Sydney that I realised maybe I was an artist and I quite enjoyed it.

 

There is a common theme of structure and form in your artworks, do you have a connection with architecture and building?

I grew up in Castlecrag - which was founded by architect Walter Burley Griffin and his wife Marion Griffin. The suburb is filled with incredibly designed houses and buildings. From a very young age I remember walking through the suburb with my Nonna and loving all the flat roofed structures and hard lines (Burley Griffin is known for his flat roof design). I have also maintained an interest and later helped with my father’s various developments and renovations. Drawings plans, perspectives and helping with the design of his projects allowed me to develop skills and explore an ongoing love of architecture, and building.

Where did your artistic journey start and where did your passion for art come from?

It started from a very young age, I always took a liking to painting, drawing, anything creative really. After completing high school, I went on to study a BFA Honours at the National Art School which allowed me to develop my skills and meet like-minded people.

 

Did you always imagine yourself to be an artist?

Not really, I knew I’d end up in something creative - but thought it would be design or something in fashion - it wasn’t until I’d had a big solo show in Sydney that I realised maybe I was an artist and I quite enjoyed it.

 

There is a common theme of structure and form in your artworks, do you have a connection with architecture and building?

I grew up in Castlecrag - which was founded by architect Walter Burley Griffin and his wife Marion Griffin. The suburb is filled with incredibly designed houses and buildings. From a very young age I remember walking through the suburb with my Nonna and loving all the flat roofed structures and hard lines (Burley Griffin is known for his flat roof design). I have also maintained an interest and later helped with my father’s various developments and renovations. Drawings plans, perspectives and helping with the design of his projects allowed me to develop skills and explore an ongoing love of architecture, and building.

"Drawings plans, perspectives and helping with the design of my Dad's projects allowed me to develop skills and explore an ongoing love of architecture, and building."

"Drawings plans, perspectives and helping with the design of my Dad's projects allowed me to develop skills and explore an ongoing love of architecture, and building."

With such bold and beautifully put together palettes, do you have a colour formula or colour approach as you come up with a concept?

No, not at all - I just go with whatever colour I’m feeling into or think will work with the composition.

 

We have read that you are experimenting with a furniture capsule, that’s exciting! What inspired this extension of your artistic portfolio?

I’ve always loved design and had been itching to extend beyond painting I’m always thinking about what I can do next, or where I can take things. It started with my Paravent’s (folding screens) which were inspired by Architect Le Courbusier’s. They were received well, and I was happy with the consistency they had with my paintings. It made sense progression wise and felt like the right development. From there, I designed three pieces - two of which will be launched at this year’s Sydney Design Fair in September, I’m super excited about this.

 

What does original artistry mean to you? Who you are.

With such bold and beautifully put together palettes, do you have a colour formula or colour approach as you come up with a concept?

No, not at all - I just go with whatever colour I’m feeling into or think will work with the composition.

 

We have read that you are experimenting with a furniture capsule, that’s exciting! What inspired this extension of your artistic portfolio?

I’ve always loved design and had been itching to extend beyond painting I’m always thinking about what I can do next, or where I can take things. It started with my Paravent’s (folding screens) which were inspired by Architect Le Courbusier’s. They were received well, and I was happy with the consistency they had with my paintings. It made sense progression wise and felt like the right development. From there, I designed three pieces - two of which will be launched at this year’s Sydney Design Fair in September, I’m super excited about this.

 

What does original artistry mean to you? Who you are.

Along with your art, you also have incredible style. What does the art of dressing mean to you and what inspires you when it comes to dressing before an event?

Oh thank you! The art of dressing, to me- means putting together an outfit that reflects who you want to be, or what you need on that particular day. It can change from day to day, and it can shift with moods. For example, when I was younger and knew I’d be seeing an ex I’d always wear leather trousers or a leather jacket because I feel like leather gives you strength. It’s literally another layer of skin, protecting you and dressing the confidence on. I’ll usually source inspiration from the event itself, and I’ll plan my outfit weeks (sometimes months) beforehand in my head. Sometimes I’ll make mini look books for my own outfits on Canva, so I can see if the shoes work with the dress, the bag etc. And in extreme cases (like my wedding) I’ll print off said look books, so when packing I don’t forget any elements. I love clothes, and hold my memories in my wardrobe, I can tell you exactly what I was wearing at most significant events in my life, even the mundane and insignificant I can often recall too.

 

Name a place or time that you felt most inspired? Paris, this year on our honeymoon - it was around the time of couture fashion week, so occasionally you would pass a flouncing tulle skirt or starchy white shirt on a chic Parisienne woman. And the buildings, the light, all of it. The elegance of Paris is a reminder to strive for sophistication; a two-piece linen suit is always appropriate. Every time you visit, you’re reminded that you dress for her - for Paris.

 

Where is your next destination? Home (for a while). We just moved into our new house in Paddington, so I’ll be furiously setting that up whilst squinting my eyes and pretending I’m in London. And Whale beach for the summer, boats, salt, sand and martinis at Barrenjoey house.

Along with your art, you also have incredible style. What does the art of dressing mean to you and what inspires you when it comes to dressing before an event?

Oh thank you! The art of dressing, to me- means putting together an outfit that reflects who you want to be, or what you need on that particular day. It can change from day to day, and it can shift with moods. For example, when I was younger and knew I’d be seeing an ex I’d always wear leather trousers or a leather jacket because I feel like leather gives you strength. It’s literally another layer of skin, protecting you and dressing the confidence on. I’ll usually source inspiration from the event itself, and I’ll plan my outfit weeks (sometimes months) beforehand in my head. Sometimes I’ll make mini look books for my own outfits on Canva, so I can see if the shoes work with the dress, the bag etc. And in extreme cases (like my wedding) I’ll print off said look books, so when packing I don’t forget any elements. I love clothes, and hold my memories in my wardrobe, I can tell you exactly what I was wearing at most significant events in my life, even the mundane and insignificant I can often recall too.

 

Name a place or time that you felt most inspired? Paris, this year on our honeymoon - it was around the time of couture fashion week, so occasionally you would pass a flouncing tulle skirt or starchy white shirt on a chic Parisienne woman. And the buildings, the light, all of it. The elegance of Paris is a reminder to strive for sophistication; a two-piece linen suit is always appropriate. Every time you visit, you’re reminded that you dress for her - for Paris.

 

Where is your next destination? Home (for a while). We just moved into our new house in Paddington, so I’ll be furiously setting that up whilst squinting my eyes and pretending I’m in London. And Whale beach for the summer, boats, salt, sand and martinis at Barrenjoey house.

Follow @annalisaferraris

James Makin Gallery, Melbourne

Mitchell Fine Art, Brisbane

 

Annalisa will be exhibiting paintings at Sydney Contemporary in September, 333 Art projects in partnership with Clayton Utz Sydney, Ken Done Sydney in November and Mitchell Fine Art Brisbane in December. The debut of her furniture will be at Sydney Design Fair, September.

Annalisa's edit...

Follow @annalisaferraris

James Makin Gallery, Melbourne

Mitchell Fine Art, Brisbane

 

Annalisa will be exhibiting paintings at Sydney Contemporary in September, 333 Art projects in partnership with Clayton Utz Sydney, Ken Done Sydney in November and Mitchell Fine Art Brisbane in December. The debut of her furniture will be at Sydney Design Fair, September.

Annalisa's edit...

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